2017 Season Recap | VR7 Colorado Cycling Team

VR7 Colorado Cycling Team’s 2017 Season Recap

Velorama Crit 34

Photo Credit: Reid Neureiter https://www.flickr.com/photos/21085902@N08/

 

The road season has come to a close. Our team had a fantastic season. We achieved some great results. We accomplished our goal for the season, which was, “Have fun riding bikes while promoting our sponsors, partnerships, and the sport of cycling.”

Littleton crit chris

Photo Credit: Reid Neureiter https://www.flickr.com/photos/21085902@N08/

 

Sponsors

First off, I would like to thank our generous sponsors. The season would not have been the same without their support. Thank you sponsors!

Spangalang Brewery

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Riders

I would like to thank all of our riders who put in the miles and effort to make this season a success. We had some fantastic results this year, and we had a good mix of riders. We welcomed some new comers to the mix who were a great addition. We had some guys take on challenges like ironman as well as some who raced out of state. Chris Parsons won the 45+ New Mexico Regional Criterium Championships.

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Bannock Street Criterium

Our team helped race director Deidre Moynihan with the Bannock Street Criterium. The criterium was a success this year and our riders volunteered their time to help with course marshalling, set up, medals, and clean up. The course went the opposite direction from past years.  It was an honor to be a part of this event. We hope to continue to work with Deirdre in the future on events.

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Statistics

For those cyclists who crave data I pulled together some stats from the season. See the table below for active roster and Race information.

csp crit ben and ryan

Photo Credit: Reid Neureiter https://www.flickr.com/photos/21085902@N08/

 

Number of Race Entries: 104

Number of Racers that participated in at least one race: 9

Number of Criterium Entries: 79

Number of Road Race Entries: 7

Number of Hill Climb Entries: 0

Number of Time Trials: 7

Number of Cross Races: 8

Number of Top Ten Finishes: 39

Number of Podium Spots: 15

Number of First Place finishes: 4

csp crit mike

Photo Credit: Reid Neureiter https://www.flickr.com/photos/21085902@N08/

 

Most races ridden by an individual: Ben Jendrek took this honor with 24 races.

Most Podium spots by an individual: Chris Parsons knocked this one out of the park with 8 podium spots! He had a fantastic season. Mike DeSena was not too far behind with 5 total and a Category upgrade.

Most First Place finishes by an individual: Chris Parsons  found the top spot on the podium twice this year!

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Below is The totals for the season by Rider.

#252625 Devin Rhinehart
Race Date Race Format Category Place
08/30/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 3
08/23/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 1
08/12/17 Velorama Pro-Am Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 12
08/09/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 5
08/05/17 Littleton Twilight Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 20
07/19/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 7
07/16/17 Boulder Orthopedics Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 7
07/09/17 Longmont Criterium – CO Senior Crit Championships Criterium SM 4-5 34
07/05/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #3 Criterium SM 4-5 8
06/28/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #2 Criterium SM 4-5 8
06/21/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #1 Criterium SM 4-5 15
06/11/17 Ridge at 38 Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 23
06/10/17 Best on Hess TT Time Trial SM 4-5 13
06/03/17 City Park Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 38
06/03/17 City Park Criterium Criterium SM 3-4 45
05/13/17 Wheels of Thunder @ Flatrock Criterium SM 4-5 7
Totals
Totals
#361784 Michael De Sena
Race Date Race Format Category Place
09/04/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – GC Stage Race SM 4-5 9
09/03/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – RR Road Race SM 4-5 4
09/03/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – Crit Criterium SM 4-5 3
09/02/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – TT Time Trial SM 4-5 18
08/16/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 2
08/12/17 Velorama Pro-Am Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 1
08/02/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 4
07/09/17 Longmont Criterium – CO Senior Crit Championships Criterium SM 4-5 5
06/28/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #2 Criterium SM 4-5 6
06/21/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #1 Criterium SM 4-5 2
06/11/17 Ridge at 38 Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 5
06/10/17 Best on Hess TT Time Trial SM 4-5 6
05/13/17 Wheels of Thunder @ Flatrock Criterium SM 4-5 2
04/22/17 Clasica de Rio Grande Road Race SM 3-4 9
04/08/17 Mercedes-Benz of Westminster 2017 Boulder Roubaix Road Race presented by Wheels Manufacturing Road Race SM 4-5 5
Totals
Totals
#326084 Ryan Kuchenbecker
Race Date Race Format Category Place
10/14/17 US Open Cross Race MM 40+ 20
10/07/17 Cyclo X – Interlocken Cross Race MM 40+ 25
10/01/17 Primalpalooza Cross Race MM 40+ DNF
09/30/17 Amy D Foundation Cross Race MM 40+ 18
09/23/17 Cyclo X – Valmont Cross Race MM 40+ 15
09/17/17 Lucky Pie GP Northglenn Cross Race MM 40+ 7
09/10/17 Cyclo X – Harlow Platts Cross Race MM 40+ 24
08/23/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 16
08/09/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 9
08/02/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
07/19/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
06/11/17 Ridge at 38 Criterium Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 38
06/03/17 City Park Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 30
05/13/17 Wheels of Thunder @ Flatrock Criterium SM 4-5 22
Totals
Totals
#367857 Eric Brodis
Race Date Race Format Category Place
09/04/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – GC Stage Race SM 4-5 14
09/03/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – RR Road Race SM 4-5 13
09/03/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – Crit Criterium SM 4-5 13
09/02/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – TT Time Trial SM 4-5 16
08/30/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
08/23/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 15
08/19/17 Modern Market Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 10
08/16/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
08/09/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 7
08/05/17 Littleton Twilight Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
08/02/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
07/23/17 Lucky Pie Criterium – CO Master Crit Championships Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 51
07/19/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
07/09/17 Longmont Criterium – CO Senior Crit Championships Criterium SM 4-5 25
07/05/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #3 Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
06/28/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #2 Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
06/21/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #1 Criterium SM 4-5 28
06/03/17 City Park Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 42
05/13/17 Wheels of Thunder @ Flatrock Criterium SM 4-5 6
Totals
Totals
#391372 Ben Jendrek
Race Date Race Format Category Place
09/04/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – GC Stage Race SM 4-5 16
09/03/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – RR Road Race SM 4-5 17
09/03/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – Crit Criterium SM 4-5 16
09/02/17 Steamboat Springs Stage Race – TT Time Trial SM 4-5 11
08/30/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
08/23/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 6
08/19/17 Modern Market Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 12
08/16/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 12
08/05/17 Littleton Twilight Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 35
08/02/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
07/19/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
07/16/17 Boulder Orthopedics Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 11
07/05/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #3 Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
06/28/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #2 Criterium SM 4-5 9
06/25/17 Mainstreet Parker Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 23
06/21/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #1 Criterium SM 4-5 10
06/11/17 Ridge at 38 Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 37
06/10/17 Best on Hess TT Time Trial SM 4-5 14
06/03/17 City Park Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 36
06/03/17 City Park Criterium Criterium SM 3-4 47
05/19/17 Superior Morgul Classic – Criterium Criterium SM 4-5 26
05/13/17 Wheels of Thunder @ Flatrock Criterium SM 4-5 21
04/09/17 CU Discovery Criterium Criterium SM 3-4 55
03/04/17 Frostbite Time Trial Time Trial SM 4-5 7
Totals
Totals
#470068 Ryan Rhinehart
Race Date Race Format Category Place
08/09/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
08/02/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
06/28/17 P2P Table Mountain Race Series #2 Criterium SM 4-5 DNP
Totals
Totals
#477494 Chris Parsons
Race Date Race Format Category Place
10/28/17 Feedback Cup Cross Race MM 40+ 4 37
08/27/17 The DFC Criterium Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 1
08/06/17 Mike Nields Mem’l Bannock St Crit Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 2
08/05/17 Littleton Twilight Criterium Criterium MM 40+ 1-2-3 DNP
07/23/17 Lucky Pie Criterium – CO Master Crit Championships Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 44
07/16/17 Boulder Orthopedics Criterium Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 2
07/09/17 Longmont Criterium – CO Senior Crit Championships Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 3
06/11/17 Ridge at 38 Criterium Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 2
05/13/17 Wheels of Thunder @ Flatrock Criterium MM 40+ 3-4 21
04/08/17 Mercedes-Benz of Westminster 2017 Boulder Roubaix Road Race presented by Wheels Manufacturing Road Race MM 40+ 3-4 30
06/24/17 2017 New Mexico Regional Criterium Championships Criterium 2
06/24/17 2017 New Mexico Regional Criterium Championships | CRIT | 45+ Criterium 1
06/25/17 Las Campanas Classic Regional Road Race Championship | RR | Masters | 45+ Road Race 3
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From the Coach | Choosing a goo

These days a ridiculous amount of “goo” products available, in fact there are probably too many at this point. So how do I choose you ask?? Well you have come to the right place. Here is the VR7CO informal and unscientific guide to choosing your race fuel.

Why goo?

This guide is intended for a crit racer, so most of your time during a race is spent hunched over your bike trying to keep your heart from leaping from your body. With that going on, you cannot really take down a ham sandwich. A goo is ideal for a few reasons:

  • You can store it in a convenient spot and not a back pocket (think tucking it under your leg band or something)
  • You can open it, eat it and dispose of it in seriously 5 seconds with 1 hand
  • It is a proper amount of carbohydrate and calories for the duration of a crit race (assuming 40 mins – 1 hour duration)

The many faces of goo

All natural’ish

natural goos

Natural goos: Untapped, Huma, and Stinger goos

 


I call these natural’ish because all gels tend to be natural, they are just sugar variations after all. But I suppose there is a degree of processing involved in producing various sweeteners (tapioca, evaporated cane juice, brown rice syrup etc.) and perhaps these have less processing involved since they use raw ingredients like maple syrup, honey and fruit purees. Note that most of these gels also use the sweeteners I just mentioned in parallel with their natural CHO source.

Natural gels tend to taste better and go down easier, though they are weaker nutritionally than the alternative. If you like the natural option, look for something sweetened with brown rice syrup (higher maltose content). Maltodextrin is hailed as the king of carbohydrates for energy gels. Its production process is very similar to brown rice solids (syrups) and chemically they are very similar. Maltodextrin is a chain of glucose molecules, while maltose is 2 glucose molecules.

The other side of these natural gels is that they tend to be more expensive. Huma charges ~$2.49 per gel…..ouch. Fortunately, their simple ingredient list means you can make them at home. At my house we make a lot of our own baby food, and turning the baby food assembly line into a DIY energy gel line was very easy. I would recommend trying to make your own before buying these at the store. Seriously, maple syrup gel? Just buy maple syrup at the store and put it in a flask. Throw some chia in it while you are at it. There you go, you made your own gel.

Engineered Nutrition

engineered gus

Engineered goos: GU, Hammer Gel, and Clif Shot goos

 

Alrighty, here are your classic gels. When I think of an energy gel I think of companies like GU and Hammer. Hammer particularly strikes me as a company who pays a lot of heed (pun intended) to getting to the scientific foundation of which carbohydrate source is the best for fueling endurance activity. They have a literal library of information on carbohydrates, you should read some of it.

If you check the ingredients on these babies you will likely see something in common. Ingredient #1 – maltodextrin. I do not want to get into a technical debate on carbohydrates, but maltodextrin seems pretty darn solid in terms of fueling you on your bike. Maltodextrin sounds weird, but it is simply a sweetener made from rice starch.

Depending on what you go with, these can range in price from $1.40 to $2.50.

What do I pick?

It is hard not to be drawn towards a natural gel. These guys have sweet websites and their marketing is great. Also, it feels trendy. But, they are expensive and I can’t get past how easy they are to make. I whipped up a dozen Huma imitations in 30 minutes with some modifications that I feel improve the overall gel performance.

Based on that, I say make your own “natural” gels for daily training. For race time, grab a GU or a hammer gel to maximize your performance. If you are lazy and do not want to make anything, stick with GU or Hammer for everything.

Further Reading

http://www.hammernutrition.com/knowledge/endurance-library/

http://www.clifbar.com/hubs/nutrition

http://www.glucochem.com/products/rice-syrup-solids/

http://www.ciranda.com/sites/ciranda.com/files/Ciranda%20TapiOK%20Syrup%20Comparison%20Chart_1.pdf

http://www.humagel.com/learn-the-science/

 

Where we’re going, we don’t need roads……

I said it, no roads.  Translation, riding your trainer!  Trainer riding literally get’s no one excited (except that strange dude who just set the record for longest indoor ride….)  but, that might be about to change.

I recently discovered the joy of riding indoors with an ANT+ usb stick.  These little gems cost about $45 dollars, and transform your PC into an amazingly powerful bike computer.  I opted to purchase the Garmin stick since there was some familiarity there, but numerous brands sell the exact same product.  Here is a quick guide on what you can do with an ANT+ stick and how to do it.

ANT Stick



What is ANT+?

ANT+ is a basically a wireless communication protocol that allows devices to talk to each other.  ANT+ allows your heart rate monitor to transmit data and be displayed on your Garmin Edge for example.  The genius behind ANT+ is that every ANT+ device communicates in the same manner so the potential for interoperability is enormous.  The secondary genius behind ANT+ is their wealth of developer resources that they make available for free.  You can develop custom windows applications, mobile apps, etc. with some basic programming knowledge using the resources published by the ANT+ folks.

What does an ANT+ USB Stick do?

The USB receiver can listen to all of the data broadcast by nearby ANT+ sensors and then transmit the data into your computer.  Your computer can then operate software to decode the data and display all sorts of neat metrics.  It is especially nice for those of us with a “dumb” trainer (Cycleops Fluid 2 anyone….?) because we can utilize a trainer curve within software to translate our speed into power data.  It also allows you to use web based training services that require input from your bike (think Zwift).

How do I get started?

  1. Go online and buy a stick & make sure it looks like the above picture. There are some older sensors which do not have the functionality of the modern versions. If you are nervous about this, buy it through the Garmin website, it might be more expensive but you know what you are getting.
  2. When it arrives, plug it into your computer at which point the drivers will be automatically installed. The stick is now ready to receive data. Easy!
  3. Now it is time to find some software

Maximum Trainer |Recommended for solo riding

This is a wonderful program.  It is currently in beta and is free to use. Download it here https://maximumtrainer.com/download-mt .

MT 1

Why it’s great:

| Set up is a breeze. It connects automatically to your USB stick and will pair your active ANT+ sensors as soon as they start transmitting.

| You can design custom workouts in a really stellar interface. The folks at Garmin Connect could learn a thing or two from MT’s workout editor.

MT 2

| If you do not want to write your own workouts, there is a standard Tri training plan in the program with a few dozen workouts to use. In talking with the developer of MT it sounds like future training plans will be added.

| When following a workout there is a really neat display concept which plots your current power on a graph also displaying a target power band. It takes all of the guess work out of intervals, and has a game like feel when trying to get your power line within the band.

MT 3

| There is support for power data for various trainers given you have a speed sensor on your bike. This is the best part about any ANT+ software for biking; you can implement a trainer curve to get power data in lieu of having to purchase a power meter.

| You can open media during a workout so you can nail your intervals while watching a movie or Netflix (MT supports opening a browser window within the workout UI.)

Zwift | Recommended for fun (if you can get into Beta)

Zwift 1

We have all heard of Zwift by now, it is web based application that controls a little cyclist avatar of yourself via the data from your bike sensors.  You pedal faster, your avatar pedals faster.  The program is in beta, and receiving an invite is tricky. It is hard to discuss Zwift having never used it, but the concept sounds fun and there has been some positive feedback amoung the pro peloton.  Ted King seems particularly taken by it.

http://zwift.com/

Why It’s Great:

| Power data without a power meter! Again, Zwift can implement a trainer curve using your ANT+ speed sensor data and estimate your power output, this is awesome.

| Zwift looks like a game, which is great because games are fun and riding your trainer is traditionally not fun. The motivating aspect of competing while on your trainer is a slam dunk.

Zwift 2| Zwift can implement any course it wants for you to ride on. This is visually appealing, but lacking feedback to your bike it is not too extraordinary.  The cool thing about this is the potential for leaderboards.  You can ride segments in a Strava-like fashion and put your stamp on the internet cycling world.

Trainer Road | For the goal minded

Trainer Road 1

TrainerRoad has been getting some good press this winter and for good reason. It is software for your PC or mobile device which allows you to follow structured plans / workouts designed for the indoor trainer. A smart trainer or USB stick is required.

Why It’s Great:

| Live Feedback – similar to Maximum Trainer, TrainerRoad collects data from your bike sensors, crunches some numbers and then sends data to your display device. You also get live visuals telling you what to do during the workout.

Trainer Road 2

| TrainerRoad supports many platforms so you can use it on your phone, on the web or in a desktop application.

| Structured training is TrainerRoad’s niche. They offer a whole library of workouts in addition to training plans.

| TrainerRoad supports media within the workout view (just like maximum trainer) so you can watch your Netflix while you are increasing your VO2max.

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So there you have it, a world of sweet – sweet cycling awaits you once you have an ANT+ stick. Enjoy the future my friends!

| CB

From the Coach | Detraining

Now that the weather is cooling off a bit and it is basically dark out the entire day, many of us might be considering a short break from the bike. Though, in our typical cyclist mindset we won’t do much of anything until we know the effect it will have on our fitness. Well, as you may suspect a pro longed period off the bike will not make you faster, but it isn’t going to spoil the upcoming season either.

If a break sounds nice at this point in the year, go for it. A week off will do you good mentally, and depending on your current level of fatigue it might even make you faster. If you are really enjoying your new bike free lifestyle and opt for another week of sloth then you will start to chip away at your fitness. Similar to training, during detraining your high intensity related adaptations will be the first things effected and there will be a notable reduction in your VO2max after two weeks of rest.

Anything beyond two weeks and your hard earned quads of doom will begin to shrivel up. Your muscle capillarisation will decrease and a conversion of muscle fibers will begin, greatly reducing your maximal output. If this sounds depressing (I am cringing just writing it), then get back on your bike after the 2 week mark.

2 weeks is a bit of a threshold for detraining, if you can limit your break to this duration you don’t have much to worry about. For those who are taking an unplanned break due to sickness or injury that goes beyond two weeks, don’t sweat it. If you can’t ride, you can’t ride, don’t beat yourself up.

Here is an arbitrary curve showing the potential for detraining over an eight week period.  This is for an athlete who had trained up until the 0 day point, so they had some momentum going into the break.  Keep in mind that this is a generic curve and every athlete will retain fitness differently, but it illustrates that you will get a short term boost from resting (by shedding fatigue) but then you will start to lose fitness quickly.

 

Detraining Curve

A final thought, most modern literature on training adaptations will show that you can reduce your training volume (duration x frequency) by about 2/3 if you maintain the same intensity in your sessions without significantly affecting your VO2max. This holds true for several months and certainly long enough to get you through the winter (especially if you crank up the intensity.) Use this as a guideline for structuring your breaks / training routine this winter.

CB

From the Coach | Pedaling Technique

Pedaling technique has long been my favorite thing to ignore while on the bike, but recently I have been giving it a bit more thought. Should I be pulling more, should I be trying to pedal circles, what cadence should I be at etc etc etc.

The questions are infinite, so let’s ignore cadence and only discuss the pedal stroke for now. I like to break the pedal stroke into two parts: the push, and the pull.  Many cyclists talk about “circling” which adds in an extra gliding portion to the stroke, but I think that is just a bit too much to be thinking about when you should be riding your bike instead.

So, you can push and pull – how much of each is the best? Well, in my tradition of never giving a yes or no answer, it depends on what you are trying to achieve.  It turns out that focusing on the pull portion of the stroke increases your torque production, and evens out the torque distribution throughout your pedal stroke at the expense of decreasing your overall efficiency.  Focusing on pushing is the most efficient way to pedal, but you do not get the benefits mentioned from the pulling focused pedal stroke. Trying to focus on both will make your brain explode, do avoid that if you can.

What do you focus on? Focusing on the push should be your default mode, so when you turn your brain off you eventually pedal this way naturally.  I think most guys ride like this anyway, but I do know some cyclists who are really pulling hard every single pedal stroke.  The bottom line is you want to be as efficient as possible at all times, so push those pedals.  If you need some extra juice, then start really pulling hard for a few seconds, but there is no reason to ride like that all of the time.

Disclaimer | Studies I have seen are showing differences in the range of 1-2% for gross efficiency results for pushing, pulling and circling focused pedal strokes so it is not a huge deal.  But then again, every little bit counts.

The boys at GCN just chimed in on this debate as well. Check out their video below.

Happy pedaling.

CB

From the Coach | Winter Training

Colorado has been blessed with an unusually pleasant October, so cyclists have yet to be banished to their indoor trainers.  Yet, it is time for most of us to begin thinking about the 2015 season and how we are going to handle our off-season.

There is no shortage of options for how to structure a winter training plan, but I think  a few essential guidelines that I will be following and prescribing to the VR7 riders.

#1 – Do a benchmark test once you begin riding indoors more often than not.  

Hop on your trainer, and bust out some intervals and record your power and heart rate data.  Pick whatever intervals you will be working on this winter.  If you really want to improve your 1 minute power, do 5 x 1 minute intervals and record your average power and heart rate.  Use this as your starting point for the winter and re-test every 6 weeks to gauge progress.

#2 – Be consistent

It may not be fun to ride a trainer, but it is predictable.  Pick a few days a week to ride and stick to it.  Doing a morning and a afternoon session is an easy way to get in some volume without the monotony of 3 hours in a row on the trainer.

#3 – Forget base building

Everyone defaults to a base building mindset for the winter.  This is unfortunate because people tend to ride a ton of Zone 2 on their trainers, but not put in enough volume to get any benefit.  I propose to forget all about base building until you can get outside again.  Ride hard, do intervals, mix things up.  Come March, put in some big aerobic miles if you think that type of training helps, but don’t sweat it while you are locked inside.

Coaches always warn about burnout if you ride hard during the winter, which is a baffler.  Trying to do big volume in the winter is the fastest way to burnout if you ask me.

Remember, we race crits, not Ironmans.

#4 – Lift a weight?

Sure lift some weights, but make sure you do it in spandex 😉

Honestly, weight training has some great benefits.  Get with a trainer or your coach and come up with a plan to add some weight training to your routine.  There is a reason track sprinters are in the gym more than they are on the bike.  Strength is a big deal, and not just on the track (I am looking at you crit racers.)

Try it in the winter, see how your benchmark test has improved (or not) and continue through the season if it works for you.

#5 – Have a minimum goal for weekly hours

Try to maintain 3.5 hours a week on the bike.  This should be enough to keep your fitness stagnant or maybe slightly declining. If you are feeling spry, log some more hours and you might even get fitter over the winter.

#6 – Get a “performance manager”

Get a power meter, and get on board with some type of performance management software, or make your own if you are a smarty pants.  It takes some of the mystique away from training (love it or hate it), but it really helps in evaluating your training load, fatigue and progress.  My cycling never improved faster than when I started seriously evaluating the quality of my training and managing it with a goal in mind.

That’s all for now, happy training all.

Coach Ben

Team News | We Are Official…kind of

VR7 Colorado Cycling Team opened up our bank account and deposited our first sponsor check, we are official!

Thank you American Roofing Supply, Inc. for supporting the team for 2015 and Colorado Credit Union for handling our account.

VR7 - Banking!

VR7 Colorado Cycling Team is Official!